Draughts analysis by Wieger Wesselink

Schwarzman,A. - Georgiev,A. 1-1 2009.06.13

The 7-th round of the match was a very balanced game. This is perfectly illustrated by the evaluation graph of the computer program Horizon, that shows an almost flat line. During the game the evaluation is updated after each move of the players, giving the spectators an idea of the current situation on the board. This new feature was programmed by Feike Boomstra, and it was welcomed enthusiastically. Together with the live chat that was realized by Piet Bouma this all adds greatly to the experience of the internet spectators. The internet coverage of a draughts event has never been better than during this match in Twente.

1.34-29 17-22 2.32-28 19-23 3.28x17 12x21 4.40-34 14-19 5.45-40 8-12 6.37-32 11-17 7.33-28 10-14 8.39-33 20-24 9.29x20 15x24 10.44-39 5-10 11.50-45 10-15 12.41-37 21-26 13.31-27 6-11

diagram 1
diagram 1

It's a classical game this time. 14.37-31 26x37 15.42x31 2-8 Georgiev wants to break the classical structure with a 3x3 exchange that leads to a lively game type with a white piece on 6. But for white it is not attractive to allow this to happen. For example after 16.47-42 17-22! 17.28x6 23-29 18.34x23 19x26 white has a weak piece on 36. Therefore Schwarzman decides to take an exchange.

16.34-29 23x34 17.40x20 15x24 18.46-41 18-23 19.47-42 4-10 20.49-44 10-15 21.33-29 24x22 22.27x29 14-20 23.45-40(!) Schwarzman has opened up the position on the 21-th move, and now he brings the piece on 45 into play. That was a bit unexpected, since by this he gives up some control over his right wing. But black's influence in the center is too weak to benefit from this.

12-18 24.40-34 19-23 25.42-37 1-6 26.39-33 7-12 27.44-39 17-22 28.48-42

diagram 2
diagram 2

Schwarzman is ready to storm the center. 12-17! 29.32-28 23x32 30.37x28 22-27! 31.31x22 18x27 32.41-37

Georgiev gives up the center, and offers white to take possession of the center square 23. Due to the missing white defensive pieces on 47, 48 and 49 this is not without risk for white. But after for example 32.28-23 16-21 33.41-37 21-26 34.37-32 17-21 35.42-37 an interesting position would have emerged with opportunities for both players.

The dutch grandmaster Hans Jansen showed a nice combination idea after 32.28-23 16-21 33.41-37 21-26 34.34-30 8-12 35.30-24 11-16 36.35-30 17-22 37.23-19? as was mentioned on the World Draughts Forum by Kosmos.

H.Jansen, black wins
diagram 2

The solution is 9-14 38.19x28 14-19 39.24x13 3-9 40.13x4 20-25 41.4x31 25x41 42.36x47 26x48!

On the Shashki Forum GMI Edward Buzinskij notes that two years ago he published exactly the same combination idea:

E.Buzinskij, white wins
diagram 2

The solution is 1.23-18 12x34 2.33-29 34x23 3.38-32 27x38 4.48-42 38x47 5.31-26 47x20 6.26x10 15x4 7.25x1!

17-22 33.28x17 11x22 34.37-31 9-14 Some spectators expected Schwarzman to play the temporary sacrifice 35.31-26 13-18 36.29-23!? 18x40 37.35x44 Then a colorful position remains after 6-11 38.26-21 27-31 39.36x18 16x27 40.33-28 27-31 that seems to be in balance.

35.42-37 6-11 36.34-30 Former world champion and reporter of the Telegraaf Harm Wiersma suggested the move 36.35-30! The main idea behind it is 20-25 37.29-23 13-19? 38.31-26! 19x28 39.26-21! W+ In this variant 37...14-20 is better, but it does not solve the black problems: 38.34-29 25x34 39.29x40 3-9 40.40-35 11-17 (or 8-12? 41.33-29! 9-14 42.35-30! and black still cannot play 13-19 due to 43.31-26 19x28 44.26-21) 41.39-34! (not 41.33-29 9-14 42.35-30? due to 22-28! 43.23x3 20-25 44.3x20 15x44 B+) with significant advantage for white. The best defense for black is therefore 37...8-12 38.30-24 12-18 39.23x12 22-28 40.31x22 28x8 41.33-28 14-19 42.34-30 25x34 43.39x30 and white has advantage, but it is not winning. And even 36...8-12! 37.30-25 12-18 38.34-30 3-8 seems a possible defense, although it is far from straightforward: 39.31-26 8-12 40.37-31 12-17! 41.30-24 16-21! 42.24-19 14x34 43.39x30 11-16 44.25x14 27-32 45.38x27 21x32 and according to the computer it is a draw.

GMI Hans Jansen sent a comment to the organization that is incorporated integrally: "Dear people, here are some comments about the 7th game. On the way back home by train I found a nice and strategically meaningful variant based on the comments that Schwarzman made in the demonstration room after the game. After 36.34-30 from Schwarzman Georgiev played 20-25 where he perhaps might have gotten a disadvantage with 37.29-24 25x34 38.39x30 instead of 37.29-23 25x34 38.39x30 that was played. Therefore Schwarzman looked at 14-19 instead of 20-25. The variant continued with 37.29-24 20x29 38.33x24 8-12 39.39-34 12-18 40.43-39. Now in the demonstration room one played 18-23 and after 41.31-26 11-17 42.37-32 16-21 43.39-33 white gains the advantage. That's why instead of 40...18-23 I propose to play 40...11-17!!! Now 41.37-32? is followed by the venomous 17-21. And after the intended 42.31-26

H.Jansen, black wins
diagram 1

black wins like in a composition using .... 15-20 43.26x28 20x40 44.32x21 (after 44.35x44 immediately 18-23 45.32x21 23x25 follows) 16x27 45.35x44 18-22 46.28x17 27-31 47.36x27 19-24 48.30x8 3x34 and white wins. A beautiful coupe Raphael. For the moment it goes a bit too deep who has better (or equal) play after 40...11-17. With kind regards, Hans Jansen"

20-25 37.29-23(?) Probably because of the small amount of time he had left (less than 7 minutes for 14 moves) Schwarzman decides to force a draw. But after 38.29-24! 25x34 39.39x30 the position was definitely better for white.

25x34 38.39x30 13-19 Black has no choice, and after the next exchange all the tension is gone. 39.33-28 22x42 40.37x48 19x28 41.31x33 11-17 42.43-38 17-22 43.48-42 8-12 44.33-28 22x33 45.38x29 16-21 46.30-24 3-9 47.36-31 12-18 48.42-38 18-22 49.38-32 14-20 50.31-26

© Wieger Wesselink http://10x10.org